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Posts tagged ‘Ruth’

Get Over It!

Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, is vividly etched in my mind. My mother was incurably excited about reaching that mountaintop. With my father at the steering wheel, we approached the little road that would take us to the top. Since I had grown up in the hills of West Virginia, driving around curves up and down hills was not new to me, however this was different. On that day, the mountain rose above the clouds. In fact, it seemed so high to my little eleven-year old eyes and mind that I feared we might be traveling to heaven. “Can we stop now?” I begged. “No! We aren’t there yet!” my mother replied with incomprehensible joy and anticipation. Why were we putting our lives in danger just to get to the top of a mountain?  It was her dream. She had heard about it and nothing else would satisfy her. What drives one person upward is often exactly the same thing that paralyzes another with fear. Once at the summit, I was awestruck by the breath-taking view, all the while trembling and holding tightly to my mother’s hand. Years later, I treasure the memory of that beautiful scene and better understand my mother’s ecstasy as she drank it in.

This fear popped up again and again in my life. My first trip to Mexico was a frightening experience for me. Mother obviously had a love for adventure and decided to take a little-traveled road through the mountains. She heard about it from a physician friend who had been there and highly recommended it. My father was driving and I cried with fear that the brakes would fail on those unpaved mountain passes with only one lane and no guard rails. I had looked forward to this family trip but, because of my fear, could not enjoy the beautiful scenery. To make matters worse, I was not a child. I was twenty-four years old and at one time had considered a missionary assignment in Mexico. Would this mountain experience discourage me from making other such trips in the future? I knew I had to overcome this fear.

Like the Psalmist, “I sought the LORD, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears (Psalm 34:4 KJV). Since then I’ve been back to Mexico with my husband and thoroughly delighted in the land and the people. I’ve traveled throughout North America, Europe and Africa and encountered some frightful situations, but was not fearful.

In the summer of 1999, a ministry friend met me at the Cape Town, South Africa airport. We were within a couple of miles of her residence when a car ran a stop sign and totaled her station wagon. I knew we were both injured and was softly calling out to Jesus. We dared not go to the hospital since  they had no medical staff in the emergency room. Some locals took us to Ruth’s house, and she phoned a Christian physician friend of hers who came right away. Ruth had whiplash and a nasty knot on her forehead. I had a broken wrist and broken ribs. There was nothing the doctor could do for the ribs, but was able to purchase a metal wrist brace to protect my wrist. We rejoiced that we were alive and completed our three-week schedule as if nothing had happened (although I had to do everything with one hand and experienced pain every time I stood up or sat down or turned over in the bed at night). Three weeks later when I arrived back home to Detroit, x-rays confirmed five broken ribs and a fractured wrist—but all were healing as they should. All praise to Jesus.

Some have said to me, “Did that accident discourage you from traveling?” My answer is, No! Since that time, I have traveled through many other countries. My fear is gone. I commit myself into the hands of the Lord who is able to keep me and accomplish His purpose through my life. After all, “ whether we live, we live unto the Lord; and whether we die, we die unto the Lord: whether we live therefore, or die, we are the Lord’s (Romans 14:8, KJV).

In the year 2000, I had the opportunity to visit the Alps on the border of Germany and Austria. I traveled to the top of one mountain via a narrow road in the only transportation allowed, an authorized tour bus. Since there was no room for two vehicles to pass, all traffic was controlled by radio. Each bus had to wait until the other one had arrived at the peak before the next one could begin the trip. Once we arrived at a parking place, we walked through a 400 foot long tunnel to an elevator which took us to the top of the mountain. There we saw the famous Kehlsteinhaus sitting all alone overlooking Salzburg and Bavaria. A short hike on foot took us higher yet to the foot of a cross perched on a rock atop the mountain. The view was worth all the emotional ups and downs and the perceived dangers we experienced on the way. A number of people in our entourage opted not to make the trip. “I just can’t do it,” they said of the mountain looming above them. But those of us who chose to go will always marvel at the beauty of God’s creation seen from the heights: heaven and earth, clouds and sea, mountains and valleys, all giving praise to their Creator. The old fear attempted to invade my consciousness, but I denied it entrance. “…but thou shalt utterly overthrow them, and quite break down their images” (Exodus 23:24, KJV). 

Israel was commanded to defeat the various tribes, one of which was the Amorites whose name means mountains. We, too can conquer the mountains in our life—the situations that seem too big to overcome. Comparing our impossible circumstances with mountains is a common metaphor. We often say, “I just can’t get over it!” We don’t feel we have the physical strength or emotional stamina to rout them. They make us feel so small. We succumb to this image concocted in our mind and readily disclose we never were mountain climbers—in fact, we can’t even get up a flight of steps without being worn out. Thus we approach the mountains in our life in the same way—with physical and spiritual energy depleted.

Remember Deborah? What if she had said, “Lord, I’m just a woman. I’ll sit here and counsel these people; but why do I have to ride with Barak into battle? Isn’t that asking too much? Isn’t war for men only?”  Of course, no such words came from Deborah’s lips. No situation would prevent her from doing whatever necessary to win the victory. When faced with the magnanimous task of leading the troops into battle, she said, “I will surely go with thee…” (Judges 4:9). Because of her obedience to God, Israel won the battle. Deborah didn’t look to the bigness of the task but to the greatness of her God who would go before her and bring the victory.

Remember David? What if he had said, “Lord, I’m just a teenager. Look at all these brave men dressed in their armor. If they can’t defeat the giant Goliath, why should I even try?”  Of course, no such words came from David’s lips. No mountain giant would intimidate him. He said to the giant Goliath: “Thou comest to me with a sword, and with a spear, and with a shield: but I come to thee in the name of the LORD…(1 Samuel 17:45, KJV). David didn’t fear the giant or his dagger because he had confidence in God. Likewise, when we put our trust completely in God Almighty, we shake off intimidations from mental images and sharp tongues while we implement a plan of attack.

In the Name of the Lord, we not only can, but we will get over every situation in life that otherwise might paralyze us from moving on to enjoy the abundant life that Jesus came to give (John 10:10, KJV). “For verily I say unto you, That whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that those things which he saith shall come to pass; he shall have whatsoever he saith” (Mark 11:23). 

Get over it!

(c) C. Yvonne Karl  –  yvonnekarl@gmail.com

Published by UPCI in The Vision, April 26, 2009

At the home of artist Patti in Somerset West (Cape Town) South Africa. L-R: Patti, Yvonne, Ruth. Note bandage on Yvonne’s wrist and Ruth’s black eyes from the accident.

 

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